Improv that Reclaims Public Space

One of the things Solarpunks like to do in their spare time is finding ways to enrich their own lives and those of others’. Doesn’t sound punk enough? Well, rethinking (and then actioning) where we gather to make any kind of art plays a role in system change, just like any other action does when we remind ourselves that we are making history everyday.

Solarpunks keep interaction with the dominant system to a minimum, bend rules and leave impressions to challenge the status quo.

This friendly bunch of Brisbane Solarpunks likes to sing and jam together, and a few weeks ago they set out to explore interesting public places in terms of their acoustics.

The stormwater drain near the highway boasted street art, mad acoustics, and friendly dogs being taken for walks. It also proved suitable for a celebratory glass of champagne.

The stone stairwell at one of our big universities enthralled…angelic echoes and heavenly vibrations…where time stops being and being takes over, without thought but with voice, hum hum hummmmmm … trying out new tunes without feeling self conscious as they are meant to be there… notes with neither beginning nor end, where it’s obvious that sound was there first…

Cosmic Harmonic Stairwell Improv

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The Art of Solarpunks: Luc Schuiten

There is plenty of art out there that could be “classified” as Solarpunk, but the genre is still so underground that not many identify with it (yet).

So I will introduce some artists who I would love to label as Solarpunks, even though labels don’t usually sit well with me…more on that in future posts. In the context of Solarpunk though, I am more than happy to label and be labelled, and hopefully so will these wonderfully inspiring individuals that presently form the centre of my artivism focus!

Luc Schuiten: Vegetal Cities. Solarpunk cities.

The Art of Solarpunks: Molly Crabapple

There is plenty of art out there that could be “classified” as Solarpunk, but the genre is still so underground that not many identify with it (yet).

So I will introduce some artists who I would love to label as Solarpunks, even though labels don’t usually sit well with me…more on that in future posts. In the context of Solarpunk though, I am more than happy to label and be labelled, and hopefully so will these wonderfully inspiring individuals that presently form the centre of my artivism focus!

Molly Crabapple is not just an amazing visual artist, but also a gutsy journalist, activist and excellent writer. Strength of character, honesty and a healthy sense of humour make her stand out from the pack. Her memoir is a page turner with many meaningful quotes and gorgeous illustrations. Her art is unique, at once beautiful, disturbing, and insightful. She is the example for artivism (activism+art); reviews calling her “a brilliant and principled artist – can’t get much more Solarpunk than that!

In my wildest dreams Molly draws the future by illustrating my novel…

molly crabapple general strike

Images credit to Molly Crabapple @ https://mollycrabapple.com/

There is plenty of art out there that could be “classified” as Solarpunk, but the genre is still so underground that not many identify with it (yet).

So I will introduce some artists who I would love to label as Solarpunks, even though labels don’t usually sit well with me…more on that in future posts. In the context of Solarpunk though, I am more than happy to label and be labelled, and hopefully so will these wonderfully inspiring individuals that form the centre of my artivism focus!

Inspiring, beautifying, thought-provoking mega murals and street art: The art of Mona Caron

StreamOfLife_MonaCaron

The Art of Solarpunks: Nylnook

There is plenty of art out there that could be “classified” as Solarpunk, but the genre is still so underground that not many identify with it (yet).

So I will introduce some artists who I would love to label as Solarpunks, even though labels don’t usually sit well with me…more on that in future posts. In the context of Solarpunk though, I am more than happy to label and be labelled, and hopefully so will these wonderfully inspiring individuals that presently form the centre of my artivism focus!

Nylnook – Comics and illustrations that portray the present and explore the future.

nylnook-nous-sommes-les-arbres-qui-portons-les-fruits-de-demain-1100x1100

Solarpunkster on Tour #8 – Reporting back on duty in Brizzzbane

Just arrived back in Brisbane town this afternoon – whoosh – 2 months gone!

But what a beautiful, intense time it’s been! About 5 weeks ago I decided to focus on the most important part of my trip- spending precious time with loved ones. That is why it has – yet again – been so quiet on the Solarpunkcity blog.

If I’m not careful these 2 months end up just being summarised in a measly 6 words: I visited my family in Germany. Now that would be a shame!

However, I filled 120 A4 pages with a mixture of notes, observations, dot points, rants and personal journal, capturing what I saw, heard and experienced while it was still fresh in my mind.

While most of these scribbles have not made it into the laptop, I have high hopes that I will yet develop a stronger streak of discipline in order to get some words out there on the state of things in Europe. I realise that I do have a slight problem with authority, even my own, making it tough for this solarpunk in the old productivity department…

And now for diving into the wonderful world of sleepless jetlagged nights with plenty of time for reading, reflecting, writing and of course some crazy dreams…

So long!

Big Love and Peace

Solarpunkster on Tour #7 – Journey to the Past

And then we were on the road again, going East this time. It was a beautiful drive past the Thüringer Wald forest, past countless solar farms which have seeded themselves along Autobahns all across Germany, wind turbines on every hill, and also a nuclear power plant – conveniently located right next to a ‘Badesee’, a lake for swimming…my Mum is pretty sure that it is one of the ones that is already turned off because it had so many problems. We see it from several different angles from the Autobahn and seriously consider taking a detour to visit and take a few snapshots…
So from the A7, we get on the A73, then the A4 towards the East (so many Autobahns…uneven A’s go north/south, even ones west/east). 

We drive past Hof, a small town (“Kaff”) in Northern Bavaria that I am only aware of because my workfriend Matty grew up there. When Germany was still divided, Hof used to be a border town and one of the entry points into Eastern Germany. 

Last time I came past here in 1987 with my Granddad, Mum and a family friend. For hours they played with me and ‘My Little Pony’ to keep me occupied (lucky me had access to such toys in Western Germany!), as we had to wait for hours in long car queues to have our papers and luggage scrutinised. And this happened on the way in as well as on the way out…I drew a picture of the long queues and my memories are fond (if slightly bemused as to what the fuss is all about), certainly testimony to the good nature of my travel companions.

None of this these days, Germany does not even have signs showing when you have entered a new state.

Then we leave the Autobahn and get on the Bundesstrasse (State Route) and it gets interesting. The roads become narrower. We pull over to let others past so we can drive a bit slower and have a look around. It has a very old-timey, rural feel, like a different world, or a different time…like we have driven to the past. 

My parents are glad to see so many old houses renovated after the long years of neglect under the DDR (GDR/German Democratic Republic) “Gubernare-Menti”. It used to look rather bleak back in those days, there was no money for such extravagant things as keeping buildings intact, the grey in grey houses were falling apart everywhere. There are still some like that around, testimony to the old days, and also quite a few LPG’s (Landwirtschaftliche Produktionsgenossenschaften, say that three times as fast as possible!), huge grey, high-walled compounds where people worked in Government farming cooperatives. 

Today there are splashes of colour everywhere, the gorgeous old houses are done up and shine in fresh coats of paints, many roofs are topped with solar panels. A variety of sheep, cows, horses, ducks and chickens peck and graze in yards and on flowery meadows. Huge fields of corn, hay, wheat and other cereals as well as hops, which is grown on some seriously interesting wire contraptions, lie between the tiny towns, and gaggles of wind turbines rotate majestically on the hills. On the roadsides grow gnarly apple trees, oaks, chestnuts, beech and birch trees, vibrant in their different shades of green.

We drive along when a huge flock of birds, hundreds of them, take off from the field on the right, fly above the road and our car, through the trees and then along the field on the left, keeping pace with the car for a few hundred metres before some electric wires inspires them to fly around and up and change course and swarm around more. Definitely the highlight of today’s journey! Unfortunately no photos because we were all too busy looking!

We stop in Bernstein to check in with the well marking a longitude (or latitude?) crossing right through there. Then we miss a turn and get to drive an extra bit through the country side, my Mum all the while reminiscing, then remembering a cousin of her Mum’s that they used to visit somewhere around here, and they had to catch a bus and walk a really long way…along that road…or was it this one?

We are glad that we decided against our plan to visit Dresden for a few hours – it would have made our day too hectic. We arrive in Ostritz and the Abbey St Marienthal, first built in 1234, at 4pm and are again blown away by how much work has been done to make this place into the gem it once was, also in light of the terrible flooding this region experienced in 2010, when a dam wall broke…

While the Abbey amd church are beautiful, the oppression of dogma and civilisation in general is impossible to ignore, especially with the quarter hourly “bell terror” reminding us constantly that we are slaves to time…

I’m glad I brought ear plugs and am rather excited about my large, beautiful room, which I have all to myself, with a window looking out to the herb garden, high ceilings, gorgeous old wooden floors and a desk (which I am sitting at now) which beckons me to write, to reflect, to read and to inspire…even though I am fully aware that I most likely won’t have much time…

Solarpunkster on Tour # 6 – Sunday Evening Chill Out Time

The holiday is already 12 days old today! (And terrible internet mixed with a hint of laziness has prevented me from posting this earlier!)

Every day has held so much life, love, and presence. It feels so good, so right, to be centered nowadays (most of the time anyway), to cultivate and nurture this presence, to fully live, enjoy and appreciate every moment…

Apart from that, I have definitely hit a slight low point today. It is the day after the main night at the Sommerhausen wine fest where we drank and danced with a wild variety of people. So I am feeling a little worn out. We still made ourselves a gorgeous day, with a late breakfast and then a very chilled out mini road trip to some of the gorgeous small towns around the Frankenland and along the river Main in Northern Bavaria.

Then I had a few hours to myself – precious time to have a nap and a yoga sesh, write diary and take stock of me and the now. It took a while to slot back into “me-time” – I have spent so much time with other people in the last year, and then with my family since I flew into Hamburg last week, being alone I had trouble deciding what to do first. What little routine I had is completely out (that’s holidays!) – I have not been jogging since Monday, and since Thursday no yoga or proper meditation, no journalling, no blogging, shaky internet (oh how irritating to have unreliable internet!), no reading and on top of that a lot of food I do not normally eat…

However, I have sorted some paperwork which annoyingly could not get done before I left Australia, driven a bit of Autobahn on the 500km trip from North to South (my top speed: 145km/h), had endless great conversations with my parents (as usual), gone hiking, seen a lot of natural and human-made beauty and taken a lot of photos, talked to some interesting people and finished editing a friend’s short story (I started on the plane over).

All this means that I have tons of material for blogs, but rather little time to make them into real posts…! So I concluded that I should just post what is going on – open, honest, reflecting. Like a blog should be!

There is my sister and my little nephew who I met for the first time this week, and how they raise the bar when it comes to going nappy-free right from the start…

There is the BHW, a community of people who restore old buildings from the northern German region and hold cultural events, keeping history alive…

There is Thorsten, the soulful, interesting chef from Sommerhausen’s Ristorante No.12 who opened a restaurant catering for people with food allergies in 1990 (before it became a thing), and who ensured that we had the best wine fest food ever with vegan Flammkuchen, Burgers and Sweet Potato Fries with Avocado dip…

Then there is the pioneering nun from the Vogelburg who began to grow organic grapes for wine making 60 years ago, after she got really sick from using insecticides…

There are the ‘Radwanderer’ who explore Europe by bike, riding over 100km on a good day…

But for now, there is now, and the stories can wait, as today’s much-needed rain invites us to be still and just chill…

Solarpunkster on Tour # 5 – Riding GIANT bicycles

IMG_20160725_171503

…no, not those ‘giants’! Right now, the bikes I ride are actually gigantic – they weigh little less than half my own body weight and are about as long as a car with a turning circle rivalling that of a council bus. Nonetheless, these gentle giants gather speed quickly, like a draft horse, and float along the pavement steadily. The pedal brake feels rather unfamiliar yet my spine is straight, my neck relaxed and my hair flowing in the Northern Sea breeze as Germany is no nanny state and helmet-wearing not law…we do have designated bike paths on most (busy) roads which are separated with a curb thought – while Germany might be no nanny state, cyclist safety is paramount, most likely why and also because there are so may of them.

So as I get on this Gentle step-through Giant and start riding down the road I can’t help but laugh with joy and slight giddiness. It’s impossible (in my books) to be unhappy while riding a bike. Bike riding is balm for the soul. And after riding a mountain bike on and off-road for the last six years, it’s pure joy to be back on a ‘Hollandrad’.

I get to the Chinese Restaurant way too quickly and then have to wait – I should have just cruised an extra round around the block. But so I have a few minutes to kill by meditating and watching the plentiful goldfish tank. A young boy, about 2 or 3 years old, joins me and my observations. Minutes pass, with no words exchanged. Every now and then he looks at me and I look back and smile before turning back to the tank. He does not return the smile, but stays standing there, watching the fish. Once he looks my up and down, in that curious, non-judgmental way kids stare at you. I’m in colourful hippy pants, a hoodie and Birkenstox and wonder if this experience will shape him somehow?

On the way home I turn a corner when Father Sun makes my breath stop. Hanging just above the horizon, his fiery orange brilliance mixes with my base happy giddiness and out comes gratitude once more. What a treat! Thank you, Universum – Danke, Merci und Gracias!

It’s the next day and I am hunting for food once more, but this time at the supermarket. As you can see, transporting 30 Euros worth of food by bike becomes a breeze with Mr Giant and his two baskets. Also the lunch time beers with my fave cuzzie sis have made me feel ready for some adventure…

 

Solarpunkster on Tour #4 – Airport musings @ Bangkok

VIP 2    VIP

I walk towards my gate (well, my flight’s gate) to make sure it exists. There it is, but there is a bunch of finely featured, ebony-skinned people sitting there who do not much look like they are off to Vienna. Not that I make assumptions easily, but it turns out that this is a flight to Colombo, Sri Lanka. The next gate is full of sun-burned Europeans waiting for their flight to Frankfurt and I reflect how the boarding gates act as filters for the cultural currents flowing through the airport.

I walk a little ways as there are barely any seats here and as the gate is not yet open, I want to sit down to do some writing and capture. All the strands of language. All these different features in people.

And then I see him – the biggest mullet I have seen in a long time. It adorns an older man’s head and is long enough to throw a few waves down his neck. Impressive! His shirt is bright blue with some sort of cartoon character on it and I definitely judge him and his wife to be Aussies. But I don’t really feel like small (or deep or really any) talk right now and keep walking to an empty row of five seats.

I am also kind of hungry and not feeling as stuffed as usually after a nine-hour plane ride, so while writing down my airport musings, I savour my precious Vegan Superfood Bar (cacao and ginger nut). I had saved it for a special hungry occasion and judge it worth every one of the $5 I paid for it back in Brisbane (even made on the Gold Coast – nice!).

When I next look up, I see the mullet man again, on his own now, and looking kind of lost, standing there at the railing. Then I notice his blind man stick. He looks towards me and I look at him and I smile, acknowledge. He might not be completely blind, rather just vision impaired, and in any case his other senses will be much sharper than most people’s. After a minute he walks over and sits down near me, leaving two seats free between us. I say hello and he mumbles something back. He is shy! I like that. I still don’t really feel up to a conversation but my urge to connect, spread love, make him feel comfortable and shine some light into his life by way of my sunny nature, wins out this time.

‘Wow, an airport would be an interesting place when you can’t see well.’

‘Yes…’ he smiles now. Good. ‘Very confusing.’ he goes on after a moment, ‘And this place is so big.’

‘Yes, it is. And all these different languages you would pick up on the way…’

‘Yes!’ he nods.

The conversation is slow, a bit of work as he speaks so quietly, mumbly, but turns out his wife is from Northern Germany and they are visiting family near Hanover.

‘Oh great! I will chat more when she gets back. I want to get some more writing done.’

He smiles a “no worries” and we each get back to our bubbles.

Then an a-hole arrives.